Author: Cliff

About Cliff

About GreenMoney Journal GreenMoney Journal is an award-winning eJournal and website that focuses on sustainabile investing and business. GreenMoney Journal was founded by Cliff Feigenbaum in 1992 and today he serves as Publisher and Managing Editor of this very trusted brand. Cliff is also the co-author of "Investing With Your Values" (Bloomberg Press, NYC). In 2013 Mr. Feigenbaum was named as one of the Top 100 people in Trustworthy Business by Trust Across America.


  • The Organic Trade Association and the World of Organics

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    Filed in Agriculture & Food , Ecosystems, Wildlife & Biodiversity , Healthcare & Nutrition , on by Cliff

    Article By Laura Batcha, Executive Director and CEO of the Organic Trade Association (OTA) for the GreenMoney Journal. 

    As more and more world attention focuses on threats from global warming and its impact on agriculture, organic production practices and principles are providing hope to an environmentally challenged planet.

    Studies continue to mount showing that organic farms are able to support more species biodiversity than their conventional counterparts. In fact, in one of the latest studies, researchers from the United Kingdom, Sweden and Switzerland published findings in 2014 in the Journal of Applied Ecology showing that different agricultural methods affect the diversity of life on farms. Their research found that on average, organic farms support 34 percent more plant, insect and animal species than conventional farms. In addition, organic farms had 50 percent high diversity in pollinator species such as bees.

    “Organic methods could go some way towards halting the continued loss of diversity in industrialized nations,” according to Sean Tuck of Oxford University’s Department of Plant Science, lead author of the study.

    For farmers who diligently work the earth using organic practices—starting with rejuvenating and building healthy soils, this is not news. However, it is a message that they desire consumers, agricultural agents, and policymakers to ... Read More

  • Why Monsanto Will Never Rule the Food World: The Three-Prong Movement That’s Stopping the Beast in Its Tracks

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    Filed in Agriculture & Food , Ecosystems, Wildlife & Biodiversity , Environment & Climate , Fair Trade, Finance & The Social Economy , on by Cliff

    by John Roulac, founder of Nutiva

    The issue of how we grow and process our food, while it’s always been important, is now a hot topic both at the kitchen table and on Wall Street. From the recent scandal about a chemical used in yoga mats being found in Subway bread to the rising awareness of GMOs and demands to label their presence in foods, the public is fast awakening to the need for safe, whole, natural nourishment.

    The elephant in the room is that agriculture, not transportation, is globally the greatest contributor to greenhouse gases—an issue that gets glossed over by Al Gore and 350.org alike. The media, whether in the recent New York Times food reportage or in the May 2014 National Geographic cover story on “The New Food Revolution,” all fail to mention the three most pressing food issues: the climate change connection; the vast subsidies to corn, soy, and wheat; and the massive increase in the use of Monsanto Roundup with its human health and ecosystem impacts.

    Central to the conversation are the questions How do we grow our food in a more sustainable way?and Who decides? Should America lead the world in turning over our heritage of ancestral seeds to Monsanto or DuPont for them ... Read More

  • Why Impact Investors Must Come To Terms With the Biological Bottom Line

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    Filed in Ecosystems, Wildlife & Biodiversity , Environment & Climate , Fair Trade, Finance & The Social Economy , on by Cliff
    Why Impact Investors Must Come To Terms With the Biological Bottom Line

    By Paul R. Ehrlich and M. C. Tobias, co-authors of “Hope on Earth”

    When Nicholas Stern released the ‘Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change’ (October 30, 2006) for the British government, it was already clear that global warming, weather anomalies and the consequences of unheeded business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission syndromes represented a huge challenge for portfolio management that had unambiguously put governments on notice. Despite continuing havoc amongst the participating nations to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, it had become clear that they should prepare for accelerating depletion of every major life-support system, and the corresponding societal chaos and economic loss which would result from escalating global temperatures and their impacts on climatic patterns and thus on biodiversity. Climate disruption presented new, but sobering opportunities; epiphanies regarding the true capacity of taxation to collectively cap the shadow now cast upon every financial market worldwide and on the future of civilization itself.

    More recently, in her essay for GreenMoney, “Building a Sustainable Global Economy,” Mindy Lubber, President of CERES, wrote, “This should alarm every investor looking for long-term value creation, because climate regulatory risks alone could cost ... Read More